Tag Archives: Live shit

MC Mell’o & Cutmaster Swift Live at Notting Hill Carnival London ’88 – Strong Island Radio Sound System [Marc Mac and Ian Da Rebel]

DJ Jay & MC B [Trouble Rap], Biznizz, Pogo, Cutmaster Swift. So random.

Katt Williams – On form

Good to see Katt Williams back on form again in his new DVD, even though he looks like a pint-sized pimpin version of the Pointy Haired Boss from Dilbert.

“Punched in the Windpipe” The Lord Finesse story.

Real heads had this off  Westwood back in the Denzils, but i ain’t never seen footage!!, Love the energy as people hear the punchlines for the first time..Finesse is clunky, but who really out there does it better..

Lordz of the Underground didn’t know who they were fuckin’ with, with that “yes, Mr funky-man”, those fellas better cut it out.

Jive/ RCA showcase: Steady B, BDP, Jazzy Jeff & Fresh Prince, Kool Moe Dee [22 January 1988 - 38 MINS]

More throwbacks from a Video Music Box special featuring a Jive RCA recording artists showcase [From Jazzy Jeffs 23rd Birthday].

Steady B & Tat Money – Believe Me Das Bad
BDP – Criminal Minded
BDP – Still Number One
BDP – Stop the Violence
BDP – My Philosophy
Jazzy Jeff & Fresh Prince – Touch of Jazz
Jazzy Jeff – Routine
Ready Rock C – Routine
Jazzy Jeff & Fresh Prince – Girls of the World…
Kool Moe Dee – Go See the Doctor
Kool Moe Dee – Do You Know what time it is?
Kool Moe Dee – How Ya Like me Now?

Disco Fever 10th Anniversary party footage from 1986

Documentation of the early days of Hip-Hop and Rap is difficult enough to acquire, lets face it, obtaining the rawest form of Rap on 30 year old cassette recordings of community centre battles are difficult enough to procure. The moving picture footage of Hip-Hop pioneers is even harder to come by than the aural form, whether it’s footage of a park jam with Jazzy Jay, Flash at The Armory or insider scoops from the WKCR days of Stretch & Bobbito. From the TVone photo-play of the Unsung series and the VH1 rockDocs like NY77, to Eli Gessners footage of Stretch & Bobb hard at work in the studios of Columbia University, TV channels and production houses continue to demonstrate the validity of the days of wayback with previously unseen visual documentation. Having the ability to watch a 50minute video with a bunch of Rap superstars of the future, that hasnt seen the light of day in 25 years, is nothing short of miraculous IMO.

This latest drop from the golden olden days features the ‘greatest street club in the world’ as owner Sal Abatiello described it on its 10th Anniversary in 1986. If you truly know Hip-Hop in its embryonic form, youll already know that the first Rap radio show was presented by Sir Juice himself Mr Magic, and of course youll know that Magic co-presented one of the most popular Rap radio shows with Marley Marl, known as the leader of the Juice Crew. Did you know that Mr Magic was originally known as Lucky the Magician when he started his career on PAYG station WHBI [They sold airtime for $75 an hour]. Or did you know that the original JUICE CREW consisted of Sweet G, June Bug, Mr Magic, Grandmaster Flash, Melle Mel, Mandingo, Bam-Bam and owner Sal Abatiello?

According to Dan Charnas, who interviewed Mr Magic for his publication The Big Payback in October 2007, the OG Juice Crew All-Stars were the ‘Guys who hung out until dawn, breaking balls, playing cards, drinking and sniffing. They called themselves the “Juice Crew.” Sal even made them special “Juice Rings” to commemorate their degenerate bond’. In the clip above you’ll witness these bonds, these kinships and the connection Sal created at the Fever. Did you know that the Disco Fever was the ‘first club in the country’ to have metal detectors and a gun-check at the door? It’s interesting to note that the Disco Fever was THE first disco to charge for people to get in with sneakers on, it was a dollar to get in if you wore shoes, but it was 5 dollars if you wore sneaks.

In this prime piece of old school proceedings its all about the faces, the dance moves, the leather bombers, the mock necks as well as performances from artists like Run DMC dropping unreleased verses of Peter Piper. Youll see the Kangols and the Cazals, the Def Jam and Cutting Records promo jackets as well as the nauseous sway of the disco lights. It’s about artists like Love Bug Starski performing ‘Live At The Disco Fever’ erm, live at the Disco Fever. Melle Mels ‘energy’ as he describes the ‘old school’ of 1976 during 1986 gives me shudders, as does the shower-cap wearing, ‘green’ dealing Grandmaster Flash in the Style video also contained in this clip.

You wont witness any of the illicit goings on from the ‘back room’ at the Fever in this clip, but you can hear the avuncular way in which Sal [via Sweet G] describes the artists, that even in 1986 had progressed to successes on platforms such as ‘stage, screen & TV’, offering the viewer further evidence of how much of a family affair the Fever really was. The celebratory, kindred nature of the event is high-lighted in Whodinis closing and congregational ‘We Are The World’ type performance of Friends. Live-Aid aint got shit on this ! Run DMC share the stage along-side the Furious 5, Jimmy Spicer, Vandy C, Mr Magic and the Fat Boys as well as every other recording artist in the building that night, while a fresh-faced DJ Red Alert hangs his arm round Sal as they sing the chorus of Friends alongside the two Whodini head-liners. As Rap and Hip-Hop continue to find progression into 2012, its important to remember the innocence of these earlier times, throwbacks are a beautiful thing. More fever here, not forgetting Dante Ross’ interview with Sal for Mass Appeal magazine

From Friday, October 31, 2008 and from the same Vimeo account holder, an incredible Jeff Chang hosted panel discussion with a consummate group of pioneers from the cornerstones of the culture; Joe Conzo, Roxanne Shanté, Popmaster Fabel, Disco Wiz, Pebblee-Poo, Tony Tone, Grandwizard Theodore, Grandmaster Caz & Afrika Bambaataa alongside Born In The Bronx author Johan Kugelberg. As Chang explains during the intro, this is history.

London Posse Live in Dublin [1986] & more Deejay Mek treats…

Irelands 5 times DJ Championship winner Deejay Mek needs no intro to those that knows, he’s a monster behind the decks and relentless in his ability to nod heads on the regular. As well as being one of the finest scratch DJs still doin it live, he has 2 brand new mixes available to download, and as you can see, has the vintage Hip-Hop video collection on lock

As a close associate of the London Posse, Mek has the footage to make any UK Hip-Hop fanatic loose the plot/ their Burlington socks. The video above is a 5 minute clip of a lascivious Bionic [Jeff] and Sipho from London Posse on an old Dublin based magazine show called Megamix

As well as a brief interview with the presenter where they discuss the difference between Jamaican and American rap-singin , they drop a few tasty rhymes, Sipho rocks the Dallas theme a la ‘My Beatbox Reggae Style’ and the keener ones amongst you will notice that stand-up comedian Sean Hughes makes an appearance towards the end…

Deejay Mek – Hip-Hop Mix –  http://www.megaupload.com/?d=LFO0HX4R

Deejay Mek – Funk & Boogie Mix – http://www.megaupload.com/?d=12O5VD9K

Tracklisting for the mixes over at Meks Mixcloud page, and more info on London Posse here

Boogie Down Productions – Live at the Town & Country Club, London July 13th 1989

Re-up of an old post from July last year, as the audio has been upped to YT…

As well as puttin you lot up on the latest greatest in Rap singers and the usual nonsense, more and more of you are contacting us requestin the rarities from the HOTASBALLS Rap radio archives, for the few that say please, i’ve culled this wee number.

It’s 4 live cuts broadcast the night after the show above by Tim Westwood on the Capital Rap Show on Capital Radio.

http://www.mediafire.com/?jmgd50jntjn

Still Number One
Criminal Minded
My Philosophy
P is Free [Reggae Version Excursion]

The show was at the Town and Country Club, as opposed to whatever corporate branded trench-foot ridden hole its known as today. The T&C Club was THE venue of choice during the late Eighties for Hip-Hop [and even Go-Go] outfits playing to a larger crowd than the usual pokey sweat-soaked low-ceiling spots in London town [The Trouble Funk show that was featured on the Say What! alblum on Island back in 86 is a perfect example of the raw excitement that ensued under the T&C roof].

This show, was THE best Rap performance I have ever witnessed in the flesh, without question, and i’ve seen a few in my time let me tell ye. It wasnt because I was bouncing up and down like some lanky lunatic, rhymin along with almost every other lyric with my mates, or spiritedly throwing bows down the front, but simply because KRS had already honed his skills and created a persona for himself as the number one performance Rapper at the time, and let’s face it, not many have come close to perfecting his presence or delivery on-stage since. The clarity of virtually every rhyme was as clear as crystal that night, his phonetics were unfuckwitable, that may sound standard, but think of how many shows youve been to and that hasnt been the case.

As outta-towners attending gigs in London, the inevitable radio shows that came with travelling to the mainland from Ireland were as important to document as anything else we were at. By any means we’d record the Westwood shows, or Max n Dave or Dave Pearce or even Delroy Briscoe on Sky Community Radio, whoever was playing Rap at that moment in London, I wanted to be able to hear it at home, back in sunny Belfast. One of my best mates Andy even bought a portable radio/ tape deck in NY on one trip, just to catalog the Stretch & Bobb late night sessions on WKCR. We’d get off on the trips to 4 Star General, hangin out with and after a while, snappin on George, in his Gucci loafers and shitty nylon grey socks, we”d stock up on vinyl at Groove and head to all the Hip-Hop spots of choice at the time but the radio shows were imperishable and evidently lasting, so we’d do anything to tape em.

This show was broadcast on the Friday night, the evening after the gig, that’s a pretty impressive turnaround even by todays standards. Me and my muckers were ecstatic as we tuned to 95.8, nodding our heads to the show that we were all at just the night before, but the element that has made it an even longer lasting memory was listening to it on a roof-top across the bloody road from the venue, in North London, with it’s high Irish population. Shouts to Robin and Robins brother who let us hang out on the roof hurling abuse, amongst other things, at passers-by below til the wee hours.

The same live session from the Thursday night was also used for three cuts on the LIVE HARDCORE WORLDWIDE alblum, none of the tracks I have upped today were on that release so this is probably the first time these wee numbers has surfaced from this gig.

If you want more of this kind of thing, leave comments and you never know what might appear next, by just ripping the shit and runnin, youll never know what else could be round the corner. Enjoy.